Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis
Label Mnemonic: LCM
Epic Lab Code: LAB3525
Downtime Form: A-1a Miscellaneous Request
Commercial Mail-out Laboratory
5231 RCP
356-8593
Specimen(s):
Serum
Collection Medium:
Red top tube 5 mL (Clot Activator)
Minimum:
Preferred Minimum: 1 mL serum from red top tube
Absolute Minimum: 0.2 mL serum from red top tube
Rejection Criteria:
Contaminated, hemolyzed, or severely lipemic specimens.
Turn Around Time:
1-5 days upon receipt at reference laboratory
Reference Range:
Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis (LCM) Virus Antibody, IgG Less than 1:10 Negative - No significant level of LCM virus IgG antibody detected. Greater than or equal to 1:10 Positive - Presence of IgG antibody to LCM virus detected, suggestive of current or past infection. Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis (LCM) Virus Antibody, IgM Less than 1:10 Negative - No significant level of LCM virus IgM antibody detected. Greater than or equal to 1:10 Positive - Presence of IgM antibody to LCM virus detected, suggestive of current or past infection.
Interpretive Data:
The best evidence for current infection is a significant change on two appropriately timed specimens, where both tests are done in the same laboratory at the same time.
Comments:
Acute and convalescent samples must be labeled as such; parallel testing is preferred and convalescent samples must be received within 30 days from receipt of the acute samples. Please mark sample plainly as "acute" or "convalescent."
Test Limitations:
Lymphocytic choriomeningitis (LCM) is caused by an RNA virus now classified as an arenavirus. Rodents are the primarily reservoir. Clinically, infection usually presents as an acute influenza-like illness. Symptoms develop 5-10 days after exposure. Most patients develop fevers of 101-104 degrees F with chills and muscle rigidity. Other symptoms may include malaise, retro-orbital headache, photophobia, weakness, anorexia, nausea, and light-headedness. Some patients may experience sore throat. Symptoms may improve after five days to three weeks, but some suffer relapse with meningeal symptoms. The CF test is often used to screen aseptic meningitis specimens against a battery of antigens and a CF antigen is often appropriately included in this battery.
Methodology:
Semi-Quantitative Indirect Fluorescent Antibody
CPT Code:
86727(x2)